Part 3

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Nos. 143-149 in 2008

 

 

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Fact file: No. 147 High Street

This was the shop of Henry Burgess, a grocer and baker. He is first recorded in 1881 as a grocer in Halmer End but it is not until 1911 that no. 147 is given as his address. He is recorded until 1921. It was later the bakery of Daniel Beech and the joke shop of Frederick Rhodes.

 

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Podmore Terrace in 2008 with no. 156 nearest camera

 

 

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Mullinex greengrocer’s shop at no. 162, seen in 1980

 

 

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Fact file: No. 162 High Street

Recorded as the greengrocer’s shop of James Mullinex in 1932 and continuing with Mary Mullinex until about 1980. It then became Johnson’s. The advert on the right is from 1982.

 

 

 

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Podmore Terrace with the shop at no. 186 on the corner of Podmore Lane. The other end of the terrace is no. 156. In 1910 all the properties in the terrace except nos. 184 and 186 were owned by the Midland Coal, Coke & Iron Company.

 

 

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Podmore Terrace in 2008

 

 

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Fact file: No. 180 High Street

Mrs Emma Lockett, a confectioner, was here from 1928 until 1936. It was afterwards a fish and chip shop for a short period. By 1946 it was a private house.

 

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Fact file: No. 186 High Street

This was the Oddfellows Club in 1910. By 1912 it was the grocer’s shop of Isaac Beech followed by Mrs Martha Beech from 1916 to 1936. Lily Timmis then Harry and Edith Roberts followed. It was Eddie’s Plaice in 2000 and is now Halmerend Fish Bar (note spelling).

 

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No. 149 at left is followed by nos. 155 onwards in 2008

 

 

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Nos. 167-171 (centre) in 2008

 

 

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Fact file: No. 167 High Street

The butcher’s shop of Charles Herbert Whitehurst from 1899 until 1950, then A. Whitehurst and finally Raymond Chell from about 1970 until 1991 when the shop closed. The slaughterhouse was situated in Co-operative Lane. The animals were purchased on Mondays and kept in an adjacent field until the next day when they were slaughtered. The shop was fully stocked every Wednesday morning. (See Halmer End: A Brief Account of Village Life in the 1920s and 1930s, for further details.)

 

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Fact file: No. 169 High Street

The hairdresser’s of Matthew Dean from 1902 to 1921, then Arthur Dean until 1950. Customers queued for a haircut, a shave with a cut-throat razor, or both. (See Halmer End: A Brief Account of Village Life in the 1920s and 1930s for further details.)

 

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A scene outside Halmer End Primitive Methodist Chapel in 1953. Podmore Terrace can be seen at left with Railing Row below.

 

 

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The view past the chapel in 2008

 

 

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(Photo courtesy of Ray Dale)

 

Halmer End Primitive Methodist Chapel, built in 1867, can be seen in this photo taken on Coronation Day, 2 June 1953, with No. 171 to left and no. 175 to right of view. The photo shows Margaret Lockett, David Roberts (on pony) and Ray Dale. David's parents ran the shop at no. 186 High Street. The photo was taken by Ray's father. They all attended a tea party in the "backs" with trestles and forms borrowed from the chapel.

 

 

The building became Halmer End Methodist Church and is seen here in 2006. No. 171 to left and no. 175 to right of view.

 

 

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To the left stands the chapel and no. 175 in 2008. Next stood no. 177, demolished in the 1990s and higher up stood a block of four cottages, sideways to the road, which were nos. 189-195. The latter were demolished before 1950.

 

 

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Fact file: No. 177 High Street

This was the fruit and vegetable shop of Alexander Johnson in the 1940s. His wife Hattie (Harriet) was the local midwife.

 

 

 

Milton Terrace, nos. 200-228 High Street in 2008. In 1910 the entire terrace was owned by the Midland Coal, Coke & Iron Company which probably had the houses built in the 1890s.

 

 

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Milton Terrace with no. 228 nearest camera in 2008

 

 

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Fact file: No. 222 High Street

This was the fish and chip shop of Ernest Sibley, some time between 1930 and 1950.

 

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Nos. 230-244 High Street in 2008

 

 

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Nos. 240 (right) to 244 High Street in 2008

 

 

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Nos. 201-213 High Street in 2008

 

 

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This view of High Street at its junction with Heathcote Road (to right) is the area formerly known as Alsager(s) Green and Madew(s) Green (see Audley Historian nos. 12 to 15 The Old Hayswood Colliery and Estate). Just showing is no. 252 on the immediate left. The post office and store of William Riley & Sons, at no. 213 High Street, stands in the centre of the view (see Audley Community News no. 5 for article on William Riley & Sons, and Audley Historian no. 19 for article on The Postal Service in Audley Parish). Riley's also had buildings below and to the rear of no. 252 which were formerly part of a farm (name unknown). In 1837 it was owned by Richard Edensor Heathcote of Apedale Hall and tenanted by John Jones. The land of 111 acres included a stone quarry and the Gresley Arms public house in Alsagers Bank. (See Alsagers Bank – The Changing Face of High Street). All the farming stock and household goods of John Jones were sold by auction at the farm in 1842. There is no record of the farm after that date.  Note that the advertisement for the sale states that the farm is in Alsagers Bank. This is because the Alsager(s) Green area was regarded at the time as being Alsagers Bank and not Halmer End.

 

 

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SALE AT ALSAGERS BANK, NEAR AUDLEY,

OF FARMING STOCK, AND HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION,

By Mr. AUDLEY

On the premises, at ALSAGERS BANK, near Audley, in the county of Stafford, on Thursday and Friday, 17th and 18th of March, 1842:

ALL the Farming Stock, Implements, Dairy Vessels, Household Goods and Furniture, and other Effects, the property of Mr. John Jones who is changing his residence.

Sale to commence each day at twelve o’clock precisely.

FIRST DAY’S SALE

Comprises five capital in-calf dairy cows, on good note; two barren cows, one in-calf heifer, three twinters, two stirks, three waggon horses, one two-year-old waggon filly, two yearling colts, one in-pig gilt, gears for three horses, one narrow wheel waggon, with harvest gears; one broad wheel cart, with gears; one broad wheel tumbrel, one iron ox harrow, two sets of three harrows, one plough, one land roller, winnowing machine, one excellent straw engine, with three knives; two ladders, corn coffer, pig troughs and cisterns, measure, seed hopper, barn, field, and garden tools; about half a ton of good cheese, gig and harness, &c. &c.

SECOND DAY’S SALE

Dairy Vessels, Household Furniture, &c. – consist of tent and other bedsteads, with hangings; prime goose feather beds, bolsters and pillows; bed covers, looking glasses, mahogany chests of drawers, linen chests, painted buffet, two eight days’ clocks, cupboards, tables, stands and stools, chairs, with rush seats; oak screen, handsome fire-irons, brass and iron candlesticks, grates, fenders, trays, kneading trough, salting turnel, two box cheese presses, cheese horse and screw, cheese vats and planks, cheese boards, milking pails, brass and tin milk pans, two iron furnaces, complete; butter scales and weights, pair trowls, 240lbs.; barrels and brewing vessels, earthenware, &c. &c.

 

[Notes on old words: A twinter is a two year old beast (i.e. two winters old). A stirk is a young ox or cow. A gilt is a young female pig. A tumbrel is a cart which can be tilted back to unload. A turnel is a tub for salting meat.]

 

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By November 1987 William Riley & Sons had moved to new premises on their other site, set back in the gap at left by the sign post and post box.

 

 

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A 2008 view. The old post office became the Bosted Onion Restaurant but closed several years ago.

 

 

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Halmer End Post Office (opened 1878)

 

           

 

 

     

 

The Post Office in 1987 (right)

 

 

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A 2008 view of the former Bosted Onion Restaurant, now converted to housing

 

 

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The premises of William Riley & Sons Ltd in 2008. Halmer End post office is within the building. The house at left is no. 252, the last building in High Street, Halmer End.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 252 High Street

In 1876 this was the home and shop of Thomas Burgess, a shoemaker. The business continued with his son John. In 1917 John is listed as a grocer, followed by Miss Ann Burgess in 1932, and John again in 1936.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For details of Audley Historian and other available publications go to the Publications page on this website. For details of Audley Community News go to the News page on this website.

 

Additional information and recollections about any of the buildings and businesses would be greatly appreciated, as would any photographs of individual buildings or occupiers, which could be incorporated into the article. Please contact the society with any information.

 

Several of the old photographs are reproduced by kind permission of the Thomas Warham Collection and James Pointon. Most of the colour photographs are by Clive Millington. Other photographs have been kindly donated.

 

Many thanks to all concerned for the information and photographs received for insertion into this article.