Part 5

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

In this pre-1896 view, looking back into the centre of the village, the lighter coloured house by the horse and cart is no. 70. The next house, moving towards camera, is no. 72 with the hedges. Out of view is no. 74 which stands well back from the road and was at the time the home and surgery of Dr. Richard Vernon. No. 76 is also out of view. Finally, the shop with Hayes above the window is no. 78. The rural scene on the other side of the road is again evident.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

This is the same view in the mid-20th century by which time the right hand side of the street was built up. A car stands on almost the same spot as the horse and cart in the previous scene.

 

 

 

 

The same view again but this time in 1986. The area around the former surgery had been opened up and the house converted into two shops.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 70 Church Street

 

      

 

The building (above left) behind no. 70 Church Street was originally a fustian works. (Fustian is a twilled cotton cloth). It was owned by the Dean family who lived at no. 19 Church Street (see part 1). In 1883 Daniel Maddock rented the house and workshop for his building firm. The firm built the Methodist chapel on the opposite side of Church Street in 1896. Daniel’s son Frank had to hold a lantern for his father to do the woodwork in the chapel. Daniel Maddock had been born in Audley in 1858 and married Annie Horton in 1879. Frank, born in 1881, was the son of this marriage. Daniel died in 1909. In 1913, when the lease expired, Frank Maddock purchased the house and workshop from the two surviving daughters of Thomas Dean, Mary and Florence, for £850 and lived at the house. His half-brothers, who were Maddock Brothers Builders, moved their business from Nantwich Road and rented the workshop. Frank worked for them as a bench-hand joiner. The half-brothers were from Daniel’s second marriage to Jane Billington in 1884, following Annie’s death in 1883. In 1936 Maddock Brothers Builders moved across Church Street to set up a builder’s yard at the rear of the chapel, but with an access drive from Church Street (where Margaret’s Garden is today, alongside the Co-op). They later erected about sixteen lock-up garages on land (behind the present day Co-op) which had once been a bowling green. That business closed in 1967.

 

In 1936 Frank’s son, Vince Maddock, took over from his father and set up Vince Maddock Builders in the workshop and lived at no. 70. There were also 10 lock-up garages on this site, as shown in the above photos. In 1967 Vince’s sons, Eric and Gerald Maddock, took over the business which became Vince Maddock & Sons. Vince died in the same year. The business closed in 1994. Eric’s son Michael converted the workshop into a house which became no. 68 Church Street. No. 70 was originally two houses, nos. 68 and 70, so the number 68 was easily transferred to the new property. Gerald’s son, Paul, is the 5th generation of joiners in the Maddock family.

 

Also in the above right-hand photo, just showing above the garage roofs, is no. 66a Church Street. This house was converted from the former slaughterhouse (which closed around 1943) at the rear of no. 66, when it was a butcher’s shop.

 

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 72 Church Street

The only business here was that of the hairdresser Albert Heath who is recorded between 1910 and his death in 1923; otherwise it was a private house. It was here that Harry Matthews learned his trade before setting up in business at no. 59 (see later entry).

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 74 Church Street

In 1891 it was the home and surgery of Dr. Richard Vernon. He retired around 1900 but continued to live in the house until his death in 1946. The house remained private until 1980 when the property was divided into two. No. 74 became Rees Jones, Huntbach & Phoenix (see also no. 88) during the 1980s then P. Hughes in the 1990s, both solicitors. It was Premier Financial Services until 2007, then C. W. Mottram & Family, funeral directors from 2007 to the end of 2010. The property stood vacant until March 2013 when the office of Maddox Accountancy & Business Services opened. No. 74A became Louis Taylor during the 1980s then Cooper Collins in the 1990s, both estate agents. It is now the dog grooming and horse care business called Woofs & Whinnies!

 

 

Louis Taylor & Sons in 1982 at no. 74A

 

 

Woofs & Whinnies! (74A) and C.W. Mottram & Family (74) in 2008

 

    

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Finlays Newsagents (76-78), Louis Taylor (74A) and Rees Jones, Huntbach and Phoenix (74) in 1987

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: Nos. 76 and 78 Church Street

In 1891 no. 78 was recorded as the shop of James Hayes, tailor and draper. In 1902 Miss Alice Darlington took over as a draper. She was the niece of James and his wife Martha (née Darlington). Although she is recorded at no 76 the photograph below shows her name over the shop at no. 78. It reads "Darlington late Hayes". In 1904 she married Arthur Subden and the business continued under his name until about 1924. He is described as a draper, milliner and gents' outfitter during that time. Alice is again recorded from 1928 until 1932, as Mrs Alice Subden, draper. In 1933 Harry Harrison Heath was here as a newsagent, stationer and tobacconist. In 1947 the post office moved from no. 33 to no. 76, when the newsagent was Reginald Harrison Heath (Reg) who became the sub-postmaster. Until then no. 76 had been the front room of the Heath family's living quarters. Reg Heath retired in 1972 and the business was taken over by J. & J. M. Lewis who remained until 1983. They had the shop enlarged to enclose the post office and the area in front of it which was once the front garden of no. 76. The post office closed and moved to no. 67 (see later entry) but the newsagents continued under new management as Finlays Newsagents. It was Audley Newsagents then Newsplus (Audley News) in the 1990s. From 2005 it was Occasions which was previously at no. 28 but now run as a newsagents and gift shop (see The Postal Service in Audley Parish in Audley Historian no. 19). New owners took over in 2014 but the business closed in October 2014. It re-opened in January 2015 as Audley Newsagents under new management. On 11 July 2016 Audley Post Office relocated to this site and opened as a Post Office Local within the newsagents following a nationwide restructuring of the post office network.

 

 

 

The shop when Alice Darlington was a draper

 

  

 

Reg Heath and Norah Tapley inside the newsagents

 

 

Heath's newsagents being enlarged when John Lewis took over in 1972

 

 

 

 

      

                                                (Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Looking uphill in this view taken some time around 1900 shows the residential area of Church Street. Although there were some businesses in the remaining section they were surrounded by houses. The large building at left is the Peoples’ Methodist Church. The buildings on the right hand side are nos. 78 to 100 with nos. 104 and 106 standing end-on to the road. There is no record of a no. 102.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

This view shows the scene in 2007, minus only the chapel. The buildings on the left hand side are nos. 59-83 in the terraces.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: Nos. 80 and 80A Church Street

John Findlow, a furniture dealer, was here in 1891, followed by Joseph Carter in 1900 and continuing until 1912. George Darlington, a grocer, was here in 1916, continuing until his death in 1948. The business was continued by his wife Elizabeth and daughter Marion. Paraffin, lamps, sticks and apples were some of the varied items sold by Marion Darlington. By 1959 it was the fruit and vegetable shop of A. Herod. In 1960 Marion Darlington sold the property to Eric Maddock (see no. 70). The shop at the front of the house was converted into two shops. One was rented by Mrs Kathleen Ford, a ladies’ hairdresser, as Kathleen Salon and the other by The Ancient Order of Foresters Friendly Society as an office. The salon was later a clothes shop of Mrs A. Ralphs, a clothes shop of Mrs S. Prince, an office of Sproston, Slaney & Swann solicitors in 1987 and an antique shop of Mrs Irene Holland (see also no. 1 Church Street). Eric Maddock then converted the shops back into one to make more room for the wool shop of Mrs. P. Rhead. In 1995 the shop became OzPom with Mrs June Ward selling mixed gifts, cards, toys and sweets (see also no. 36/38 Church Street). It closed in 2003 and became For All Occasions, a florists and card shop. That closed in July 2013 and Kirsty Maddock's Live, Laugh, Love Florists opened, also selling cards and gifts.

 

          

 

No. 80 when it was Darlington’s and in 2007 as For All Occasions

 

   

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Kathleen Salon (84), Scragg & Lunt (82), Sproston Slaney & Swann and The Ancient Order of Foresters office (80A) in 1987

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Ebony & Ivory (84), Audley Tanning Centre (84A), Scragg & Lunt (82) and For All Occasions (80) in 2008

 

 

Ebony & Ivory (84), Betty's All Sorts (82) and For All Occasions (80) in 2012

 

 

G's Barbers (84), Tea Rooms (82) and Live, Laugh, Love Florists (80) in 2014

 

 

G’s Barbers (84), Oatcuisine (82) and Live Laugh, Love Florists (80) in 2016

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 82 Church Street

This was the family home and shop of John Edmund Shaw, a boot & clog maker in 1911. His son George is recorded here in 1912 as a clogger. The next recorded business is in 1950 when Len Harrison moved from no. 67 to open an electrical shop selling radios and later televisions. In 1970 Scragg & Lunt took over, selling records as well as other electrical appliances. The business closed in July 2012 and was replaced by Betty's All Sorts, dealing in gifts, toys, pottery etc. It closed in March 2014. It was replaced by Tea Rooms at 82 Church Street which was open in November 2014 but closed in 2015. Oat Cuisine No.3 opened on 24 October 2015, selling oatcakes and other hot food.

 

 

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 84/84A Church Street

Albert Heath was a hairdresser here in 1905. It was then a private house until the late 1960s when it became Kathleen Salon, following its move from no. 80A, and remained so until 2000. It continued as a hairdressing salon, first as Hair Necessities run by Rebecca Blood until 2008, and then as Ebony & Ivory. Audley Natural Therapy was at 84A, above Hair Necessities, then Audley Tanning Centre was above Ebony & Ivory. In October 2012 Ebony & Ivory relocated to no. 62 Church Street. In March 2013 the property became G's Barbers Shop. This closed in late 2016.

 

 

Kathleen Salon in 1997

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file; No. 88 Church Street

In 1891 it was the butcher’s shop of George Rowley, then his widow Mary from 1896. She died in 1924 but is only recorded as a butcher until 1910. In 1928 it was the confectioner’s shop of Gladys Moreton. From 1955 until 1980 part of the house was used as an office by the solicitor, Frank Phoenix. He qualified as a solicitor in 1939 at the outbreak of World War II. After serving as a major during the war, he formed a partnership with George Hawley, a solicitor of Longton, Stoke-on-Trent. The main office was in St John’s Chambers, Longton, but for the benefit of Audley residents Frank Phoenix opened the office at no. 88 on Thursdays only. Around 1975 the business was bought out by Tony Freida who incorporated local solicitors into groups. The firm of Rees Jones, Huntbatch and Phoenix was formed. Frank Phoenix died in 1980 and the business moved to no. 74 Church Street. (Today the firm is based in Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, but still retains the Phoenix name). Since 1980 no. 88 has been a private house.

 

Fact file: No. 94 Church Street

A private house until 1982 when it became the new premises of Gordon’s Hairdressing after it moved from no. 38.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

A 1987 view of nos. 90 (right) to no. 100 (left)

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

A similar view in 2008

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 98 Church Street

From the late 1950s this was the home of Reg Glover, a builder.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 100 Church Street

Joseph Dean was here in 1891 as a draper and newsagent. His widow Elizabeth continued the newsagent’s business in 1901 and was followed by their daughter Mabel Annie Dean in 1913. She died in 1933 and the property has been a private house since then.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 106 Church Street

The home of coal dealer David Burgess from at least 1928 until his death in 1950. Otherwise a private house, but now part of no. 104.