Part 4

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

In the centre of Church Street these buildings stand on the corner of Hall Street. They were built in 1910 at the same time as Hall Street and Hill Terrace were constructed, on a plot of land known as Leddy’s Field. The building to the left is “The Studio”, no. 27 Church Street. Next door is the butcher’s shop of Audley Meat at no. 29. The next shop to the right is no. 31 built slightly earlier in 1905. The photo was taken in 1910 or soon after.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The butcher’s shop remained for only four years, changing to a greengrocer’s in 1914. It remained the same under several names until late 2006. The next block to the right, which included the former shoe shop, was Cope Brothers when this view was taken in 1994.

 

 

Fact file: No. 27 Church Street, “The Studio”

This was the home, studio and shop of the Audley photographer Thomas Warham, from 1910 until his death in 1938. He had “The Studio” and the adjoining no. 29 built. The initials TW can be seen on the buildings. Many of his photographs have been used to illustrate this article (see The Drawing Mon in Audley Community News issues 21 and 22). Following his death, his widow Alice kept the shop, selling fancy goods, for a further three years until her death in 1941. Their daughter, Miss Louisa Warham, then continued for another three years assisted by Mrs Lucy Lowe. The shop was then tenanted briefly by Mrs Mildred Light, whose husband Ernest will be mentioned later. By 1950 Mrs Rebecca Power was selling books, tobacco, stationery and toys in the shop. Later she also sold sweets. By the 1960s it was kept by Mrs Maude Sproston who continued until 1978. Ernest Dean followed, selling cycle accessories, then Annette & Marjorie Colclough in 1980; Margaret Vernon in 1985; Mrs Sheila Caton in 1989; John Looskin in 1993; Miss Claire Booth in 1998; Mrs Linda Hallam and Mrs Janet Pepper in 2001, and finally Kevin Plant in 2004. The shop closed in 2007 and remained empty until Miss Warham died in 2012. The Studio was purchased by Nick and Marie Bentley who set up their photographic business, Studio 1208, in the premises.

 

    

 

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 29 Church Street

Audley Meat was the first occupant in 1910. In 1914 it changed to a greengrocer’s when Fred Steele relocated from no. 30. By 1930 it had passed to Alfred Edward Wright. His wife Ruth and Fred's wife May were cousins. Mr and Mrs Wright ran this shop, and later no. 56, until 1969 when they retired and left the village. Victor and Nesta Johnson took over; then George Moss in 1975; his daughter Susan Blood in 1978; Audley Fruit Shop of Philip Clayton in 1981; Bernard Payne in 1983; George Heath in 1986; Robert Clarke in 1989; The Village Fruit Shop of David and Barbara Garwood in 1992, all selling fruit, vegetables, cooked meats and flowers. In 2000 it became Peapods, run by Robert Plant and Mrs Amanda Buxton, and finally The Village Fruit Shop of Mrs Caroline Harrison in 2004. The shop closed in 2006 and is now a private residence.

 

 

 

 

(Photos courtesy of Keith Wright)

Alfred Wright is seen outside the shop soon after taking over from Fred Steele, and an enlarged view of the window display. Prominent in the display are Canadian apples and Webb's seeds at 3d per packet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 31 Church Street

Built in 1905, it was the boot and shoe shop of John William Darlington. There was a workshop at the rear in which shoes etc. were made and repaired. J.W. Darlington died in 1952 and no. 31 was purchased by J. H. McEllin along with no. 33 and continued as a shoe shop until closure in the late 1960s. Nos. 31 and 33 were then converted into the Midland Bank, which opened 1 August 1969. Mr Ron Davies was the manager until his retirement in 1985, when the bank became a sub-branch of Newcastle-under-Lyme. The bank closed in 1989 and became the architectural workshops of Cope Brothers. 1994 brought another change of use when it became the dental surgery of Jon and Hilary Ball, following their move from nearby Chester Road. It is now Audley Dental Practice.

 

 

 

 

No. 31 as Darlington’s shoe shop and as the Midland Bank in 1969

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

A view in the opposite direction shows all the buildings on the right hand side in the centre of Church Street in this 1920s view. No. 27 and no. 29 can be seen behind the telegraph pole. No. 31 and no. 33 (the Post Office) are behind the gas lamp, and no. 35, the Butt Lane Industrial Co-operative Society store is nearest to camera. Hall Street (where the bus stands) was also the bus terminus for many years for buses from Newcastle.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

By 1985 the Co-op store had closed and moved into a new store next door, which can just be seen to the right. The central block by that time was the Midland Bank, and the old Co-op was a chemist. The photo shows the old Co-op building virtually unchanged from when it was built.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The row in 2004

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

 

This was Audley post office when it was at no. 33 Church Street. Left to right in the photo are: Alice Platt, Lily Johnson, Ernest Light, John Dodd, Jenny Rowley and Alice Daniels.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 33 Church Street

In 1908 Audley Post Office closed at no. 17 Church Street, and no. 33 became the new post office. It was run by John Dodd who had both nos. 31 and 33 built. The initials JD can be seen on the buildings. He was also a stationer and printer. His printing works was located at the rear and on the first floor of no. 33. The building also housed Audley’s first telephone exchange until 1939 when a new exchange opened in Wilbrahams Walk. The post office closed in 1947 and relocated to 76 Church Street (see later entry). John Dodd died in 1950. The building was purchased by the Butt Lane Co-op Society with a view to expanding their store next door. The former post office at the front of the building became the Co-op cake shop. Ernest Light, who had worked for John Dodd and was also his nephew, took over the printing business. He retired in 1956 and Ernest Drew and Jack Mayer acquired the business which became Audley Printers. When the Co-op decided not to develop the property it was offered to Ernest Drew and Jack Mayer but they declined the offer. The premises were then purchased by J. H. McEllin along with no. 31. The shop became a part of the shoe shop next door. Audley Printers moved out in 1968 and the premises were acquired by the Midland Bank. The history from this point onwards is the same as no. 31 (see article in Audley Historian no. 10 for the full story of no. 33, and The Postal Service in Audley Parish in Audley Historian no. 19).

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 35 Church Street

Built in 1914 as the Audley Branch of the Butt Lane Industrial Co-operative Society, which had previously traded at no. 71 (see later), the store operated on two floors with food on the ground floor and drapery on the upper floor. A meat department was in a wooden building at the side of the store (at the rear of what is now the delivery access to the new store). Each department had a manager and staff who served customers from behind counters. There was a central seating area in the food store where customers could sit while their orders were made up. In the mid-1950s the store was converted to self-service, with the village hall used as a temporary store while the conversion took place. At the same time a new meat department opened across the road in no. 66 (see later entry). Soon after, a new store was built next door to no. 35 to sell furniture and drapery. By January 1969 the Butt Lane Society had merged with the Burslem & District Co-operative Society and other local societies to create the North Midland Co-operative Society. (This became more familiarly known as Normid, the name given initially to its main stores). The furniture store had not been successful and a decision was taken to close nos. 35 and 66 Church Street and convert the furniture store into a new self-service food store. The merger was the first of several and today the new store is part of The Co-operative Group. The old store became the chemist shop of B. J. Browning in 1971 on the ground floor and a separate carpet showroom on the upper floor. The latter closed and was replaced by Lady Eleanor Pottery, run by Brian Dale from about 1978-1982, and then by Audley Video Centre which also took over the ground floor after the chemist closed some time after 1987. The building became an Indian restaurant and is now the New Royal Balti Restaurant.

 

The opening hours of the Butt Lane Co-op stores in 1914

 

In addition to the Audley branch and the head office in Butt Lane, the society had stores in Talke New Road, Talke Pits, Alsager, Ravens Lane, Kidsgrove and Wood Lane by 1914.

 

 

Store managers include the following:

 

No. 35: Arthur Cork, food and Miss Heath, drapery.

George Poole was the manager when the store closed.

 

New store: George Poole until 1972 when Trevor Carter took over.

 

 

 

 

A 1987 view of no. 35 with B.J. Browning on ground floor and Audley Video Centre on upper floor. The new Co-op store is to the right.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The Co-op store in 2007

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The shop on the right in this view was Emberton’s drapers, one of the oldest businesses in Audley, founded in 1851 by Joseph Emberton. It was owned by Samuel Emberton when this photo was taken from Hall Street in 1910. He lived in the house, partly showing in the photo, which is no. 52. The shop is variously described as no. 48 or no. 50. The buildings stand on the site of Gingerbread Hall.

 

 

 

The above view, from 1948, shows Emberton’s and Bank House with Dean Hollow between

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: Gingerbread Hall

 

Gingerbread Hall appears on the 1837 Tithe Map, but is also described in a sale advertisement which appeared in the Staffordshire Advertiser of 13 February 1841. The hall, along with Gingerbread Hall Field on which it stood, was sold at auction on 10 March 1841. The field fronted what are now Church Street, Dean Hollow and Chester Road.

 

 

Eventually nos. 48-120 Church Street would be built on Gingerbread Hall Field (see 1837 Tithe Map).

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Emberton’s remained in business until 1985 but under new management when this photo was taken in 1983. By this time the house in the previous photo had long been a part of the shop. The building next door is no. 54, formerly the home of Frank Warham, a painter and decorator. By 1933 it was the home of Charles Emberton who lived here until the 1950s. In 1954 it became the home of George and Dorothy Hackney (see also no. 120 Church Street). George Hackney managed the Emberton shop until 1983 while Mrs Hackney had her hairdressing business upstairs in the shop. (For further information on the Emberton family go to: www.joseph-emberton.co.uk)

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

  

 

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

The business was extended into no. 54 and taken over in 1985 by Fred Boon who continued as a clothing retailer until 2010. The photo was taken in 2007. The property was sold and converted into an Indian cuisine restaurant, Alessi’s, which opened in March 2011.

 

 

Alessi's in 2012

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

A pre-1905 view of Church Street, looking back towards the church, with no. 66 at left and Leddy’s Field to right

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

This view was taken in, or soon after, 1910. It shows nos. 48-54 behind the horse and cart, then nos. 56-66 along to the left of the view. The names above the shops read Baskeyfield (66), Salmon (64) and Statham (62). Several of the people have been identified. Ezra Baskeyfield is in his shop doorway on the left, Edna Statham and her daughter Hilda (in dark dresses) are outside their shop, Tom Mainwaring is seated on the cart, Martha Ellen Mainwaring and her husband Leslie are at right of view.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The same view in 1985 shows several changes to the shop fronts with Head-Masters (66) at left, Capey & Co. (64) and J.H. McEllin (60-62).

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The row in 2007, with nos. 60, 62 and 64 all empty

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Audley Fish Bar (58) and Flowers By Sarahjane (56) in 2008

 

 

Audley Fish Bar (58) and Audley Country Meats (56) in 2015

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 56 Church Street

In 1901 it was the butcher’s shop of Enoch Riley but by 1905 it was the grocer’s shop of John Sherratt. By 1911 Annie Reddell was the grocer and by 1921 Thomas Hand, continuing until his death in 1942. The shop was run by his wife Florence who continued for some time after 1942. It was taken over by Alfred Edward Wright who at the time had a shop on either side of Church Street. This was the grocery part of his business but it was later combined into one shop at no. 29 and this shop was used as a storeroom. No. 56 was later a bookmaker’s and in 2008 was a florist’s called Flowers By Sarahjane, but this did not last long. In November 2009 a new business brought a butcher back on to Church Street, with the opening of Audley Country Meats.

 

 

(Photo courtesy of Keith Wright)

Mr and Mrs Wright inside no.56

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 58 Church Street

In 1911 this was the home of David Burgess, a coal dealer, and his family (see also no. 106 Church Street). From at least 1916 it was a fish and chip shop run first by James Johnson, then Levi Thomas Harris in 1932 and Ernest Fryer from 1933. In 1957 it became the surgery of Dr. D. F. Ferrington, continuing until 1966 when the Audley practices were combined in the surgery on Wereton Road. By 1983 it was Browsers antiques set up by Cynthia Roberts (see also no. 64) and Janet Parker, but continued by the latter. Later a coffee shop and restaurant, it has turned full circle and is now Audley Fish Bar.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: Regent House, nos. 60-62 Church Street

George Statham was a boot & shoe dealer (no. 62) and china & glass dealer (no. 60) at the property from 1898 until his death in 1908. His widow, Edna continued the business until at least 1921. By 1924 it was the chemist shop of John Henry McEllin. The business became J. H. McEllin Ltd in 1961, when Philip Broadhurst, a pharmacist, moved to Audley to become managing director. John Henry McEllin died in 1965 but the business continued under his name. In 1981 Philip Broadhurst became sole owner of the business and property but eventually sold all to the Co-op in 1996. Philip continued as a locum pharmacist until his retirement in 2006 and the business retained its title until 2001 when it became the Co-op Pharmacy. The latter closed in 2007 when it relocated to the new Audley Health Centre. However, no. 60 was also used by Lucy Webb, a draper, in the 1940s. After standing empty for 2 years, no. 60 re-opened in December 2009 as Body Armour Audley Tattoo Studio but closed in 2011. Joanne McCormack's business The Perfect Fit opened in September 2011 after moving from a unit at Townhouse Farm. The business specialises in clothing alterations and repairs, crafts and gifts. The ladies clothing and accessories shop of Pam Woodward, called Always a Woman opened at no. 62 in September 2011 but closed early in 2012. In October 2012 the hair salon Ebony & Ivory relocated here from no. 84. This changed to Style Sisters which opened on 31 March 2014. A further change saw the opening in July 2015 of Carmen's Nail & Beauty Salon. The Perfect Fit closed in July 2014 and relocated to The Cobbles at nos. 36-38 Church Street. From October 2014 until 2016 no. 60 was occupied by Binny, a medium and spiritual messenger. Sam’s Hen Goodies opened in September 2016, selling items for hen and stag parties.

 

     

(Courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

Philip Broadhurst is also well known in and beyond the local area as the conductor, since 1976, of Audley & District Male Voice Choir (see website: www.admvc.co.uk and article in Audley Community News issue no. 3).

 

  

(Photos courtesy of Ron Burndred and Ian Bailey)

 

George Statham was born in nearby Wood Lane in 1861 and married Edna Platt in 1888. Their daughter Hilda was born in 1893. George was a shoemaker in Tom Fields, Wood Lane but also had a shop at no. 28 in Church Street, Audley in 1896. By 1898 he had moved to Regent House and transferred his business there. George died in 1908. The photo at left shows George, Edna and Hilda in the garden at the rear of no. 60. The photo at right shows the Co-op Pharmacy in 2006.

 

1898 advertisement

 

 

 

 

Audley Village Barbers (64), Always a Woman (62) and The Perfect Fit (60) in March 2012

 

 

No.60 shop sign in 2015

 

 

No.60 shop sign in 2016

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 64 Church Street

In 1904 it was the shop of Lillian Hesketh, a draper and milliner. By 1910 Miss Louisa Salmon was here as a draper and ladies outfitter, and continued as such. She had, however, married Arthur Millington, the butcher, in 1914 but did not change her business name to Mrs Louisa Millington until around 1930. The business was a partnership between Louisa and her brother-in-law William Heath, whose daughter Elsie worked in the shop. Elsie, whose married name was Darlington, later took over the business, with Louisa assisting along with Miss Lucy Gleaves, a trained milliner. In 1940 the shop was sold to Lucy Gleaves who was still here in 1961. Dresses and hats were made upstairs in the property, especially for chapel anniversaries. The business was taken over by Mrs Maureen Whittaker, who is believed to have run the shop with her sisters Mildred (Betton) and Marjorie (Wood). In 1980 it became Paraphernalia, owned by Mrs Cynthia Roberts who sold antiques (see also no. 58). The next business, Keith Roberts, opened in late-1982, followed by Capey & Co. in 1985, Peter Wilson in 1986 then Ian Smith & Co. in 1992, all estate agents. Since 2008 it has been Audley Village Barbers.

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 66 Church Street

For many years it was a butcher’s shop. Ezra Baskeyfield was here in 1900 continuing until at least 1928, then John Carter from at least 1931 until 1947. In 1950 William Millington moved from no. 12 and remained until his death in 1955. Butt Lane Co-op then took over the shop as a meat department run by Rache Sutton. By 1980 it had changed to a ladies hairdressing salon, Bongenie. Since 1985 it has been Head-Masters hair salon.

 

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Head-Masters (66), Peter Wilson (64) and J.H. McEllin (60-62) in 1987

 

 

Head-Masters (66), Audley Village Barbers (64), vacant (62), and

Body Armour (60) in 2009

 

 

2013 shop signs

 

 

2015 shop signs