Part 2

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

No. 43A at left, followed by no. 43 onwards, in 2008.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 43 Ravens Lane

This was the home of the Howell family for many years. John Howell, a draper, is recorded here during the 1920s.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 43A Ravens Lane

In 1936 Arthur Edward England is recorded here as a fried fish dealer. By 1950 John Layland had taken over, also selling wet fish. In 1959 the business was taken over by Mr. E. Matthews. From 1965 it was Bourne’s fish and chip shop run by Ron and Edna Bourne. In 1983 it is recorded as Village Fish & Chips, a title it still has today. Eric & Lai Cornes were the proprietors in 1983. Another building once stood alongside no. 43A, at the left of the above view. It stood sideways to the road and can just be seen on the far left in the old black and white photograph above, which includes the stationmaster’s house.

 

    

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 45 Ravens Lane

This was the home of the Warburton family. Wilmot Warburton had a fish restaurant here in 1917 and was a corn dealer from 1921 until 1932. By 1936 it was the butcher’s shop of Alfred Joseph Banks, followed by Frank Stanley Banks until the 1950s. Now a private house.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The terraces from no. 96 (left) onwards in 2008

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 76 Ravens Lane

This is also recorded as The Dorren or The Doreen in records. It was the home and shop of Daniel Scott, a milliner and his wife Alice, a haberdasher. Their daughter Lilian was married to Arthur Allman and they also lived at no. 76. Daniel Scott and Arthur Allman were builders and contractors who built a pair of semi-detached houses, nos. 102 and 104 Ravens Lane. Arthur Allman and Lilian moved into no. 102.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 96 Ravens Lane

Ada Ollier is recorded here as a shopkeeper from 1936 until 1940, followed by Gleaves’ sweet shop in the 1950s and 1960s. Now a private house.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

A view of old Ravens Lane which shows no. 79 at left. The two thatched cottages are nos. 81-83. No. 79 was the birthplace of twins Victor and Arthur Burgess, both of local cricketing fame.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

No. 79 stands at the left in this 2008 view. The thatched cottages have long since been demolished and replaced by the bungalow.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

No. 118 is nearest camera with no. 100 immediately behind the telegraph pole to the right of this 2008 view

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

No. 132 at left along to no. 120 in 2008

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 130 (later 132) Ravens Lane

This was the bakery of Joseph Heath, first recorded in 1928. By the 1940s it was the sweet shop of Mrs Gatley. In 1957 J.S. Condliffe & Co. moved here from no. 28, continuing with their fireplace business. About 1964 part of the property was converted into a laundrette and dry cleaners whilst upstairs, toys and fancy goods were sold. The business closed in 1985. No. 130 is now no. 132, following re-numbering of this row of houses.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The Ravens Lane Branch of the Butt Lane Industrial Co-operative Society. The store was built in 1911 and is seen here in the 1940s. To the right of view is no. 130 (later 132) when it was a sweet shop.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The former Butt Lane Industrial Co-operative Society store. The store closed in the late 1960s and several different businesses used the premises afterwards, including one which sold seeds and another which made moulds for the pottery industry, before final closure and conversion to a house.

 

 

 

 

No. 166 at right in 2008

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 168 Ravens Lane

This was the boot and shoe makers of Daniel Sims from 1880 until at least 1908.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 153 Ravens Lane

Charles Whalley, a grocer and draper, is recorded in 1880. He died in 1889 and his wife Betsy continued the business. She appears in the 1901 census as a grocer and her son Frederick as a draper. Frederick took over the business and is recorded from 1904 until 1932 as a draper. The building was later demolished.

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 155 Ravens Lane

This was also Whalley’s draper’s shop before becoming the main shop of Proctor & Lowe from about 1940 until closure in 1982. Proctor & Lowe sold radios and cycles when the business started, and televisions later (also at nos. 28 and 171 Ravens Lane)

 

 

No. 155 Ravens Lane seen in the 1980s shortly before demolition

 

    

 

   

 

Advertisements from 1936, 1949, late 1950s and 1982 (just before closure of no.155)

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Ravens Lane at its junction with Chapel Street (to right) and New Road (to left). At the right of view is no. 170. The final property on that side of Ravens Lane is no. 178 (by the cart) which stands on the corner of Diglake Street. The premises on the left hand side in this view could be Whalley’s grocery and drapery business.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The same view in 1988, by which time all of the old buildings on the left of the previous photograph had been demolished and replaced by new properties set back from the road.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 170 Ravens Lane

Charles Whitehurst, a butcher, was here from 1921 until 1962. It was a grocer’s afterwards and by 1984 it was Ravens Lane Stores run by Irene and Malcolm Heath. Now a private house.

 

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 172 Ravens Lane

Mrs Higgins was a confectioner here in 1917 followed by Mrs Edith Smith, 1924-1928, then Mrs Annie Smith until at least 1940. In the 1950s the shop was a branch of J.H. McEllin, chemist. From 1962 to 1967 it was Wendy’s, run by Mrs Wendy Jessop. She sold ‘Wendy’ wool and children’s clothing. By 1972 it was the butcher’s shop of Frederick Douglas Moss, then Harry Hodgkinson from 1980 until 1987. Mike Doig managed the shop at no. 172 followed by John Jackson, allowing Harry to run his other shop in Audley. In 1987 John Jackson took over the business and is still here today.

 

 

   

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 176 Ravens Lane

In 1910 this was the home of Isaac Hollins and his family, but it is also recorded as a grocer's shop in the 1911 census. It is not clear from the records as to whose shop it was. The fruit shop of George Sayers was here later followed by George Sumnall, a grocer and provision merchant, recorded in 1949 (see also no. 24 Ravens Lane), then T. Robinson in 1953. It was also a café for a short period. Now a private house.

 

  

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 178 Ravens Lane

In 1916 this is recorded as Swettenham Brothers grocer’s store. From 1921 until 1962 it is Swettenham Ltd, grocers and provision merchants. It was in fact another co-operative store, offering dividend to members, in direct competition with the nearby Butt Lane store. By 1967 the store had been taken over by Victor Value and became a supermarket, albeit short-lived. It became Sallie Robinson Studio Pottery which continued until 1982, then Denise Moore Dance School before becoming a pre-school nursery by 1992, known as Nurserytime. By 2006 it was Little Scamps Day Nursery but closed suddenly in 2007. During renovation work on the property in 2011 to remove cladding, the former Swettenham's facade was revealed (see photo below). In 2012 the beauty salon Purity opened in the building.

 

 

 

 

No. 178 in 2008 and in 2011 after removal of cladding

(Photo on right courtesy of Audley Community News)

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Looking back in the opposite direction from Chapel Street shows Ravens Lane on the right of view. The row of terraced houses on the left is in Chapel Street. The decorations are for the visit on 23 April 1913 of King George V as he passed through Audley and Ravens Lane by car.

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

The same view in 2008 shows new buildings to the right along Ravens Lane

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

 

 

Ravens Lane viewed from New Road in the mid 20th century with no. 169 at right

 

 

© 2016 Audley & District Family History Society

 

Fact file: No. 171 Ravens Lane

The final property in Ravens Lane was occupied by the Carter family in 1900. Mrs Sarah Carter is recorded as running a business as a joiner, ironmonger and furniture dealer. Later entries record only a furniture business, with John and Joseph Carter continuing until 1921. Edgar Hughes is believed to have had his boot repair business in part of the property which was later an office of the Ancient Order of Foresters Friendly Society. Proctor and Lowe also had the property in the late 1950s (see also nos. 28 and 155)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For details of Audley Historian and other available publications go to the Publications page on this website.

 

Additional information and recollections about any of the buildings and businesses would be greatly appreciated, as would any photographs of individual buildings or occupiers, which could be incorporated into the article. Please email the society with any information.

 

Several of the old photographs are reproduced from the Thomas Warham Collection by kind permission. The recent colour photographs are by Clive Millington. Other photographs have been kindly donated.

 

Many thanks to all concerned for the information and photographs received for insertion into this article.